The purpose of this page is to provide a selection of common questions with answers that may help you if you are new to BlackBuntu. If you can not find an answer to your questions, do not hesitate to contact us and we will make every effort to answer you as soon as possible.

How do I update / upgrade my system ?

Running update and/or upgrade commands on BlackBuntu it’s easy as 1,2,3 … In order to do so, just open a terminal and type the following commands.

sudo apt update
sudo apt upgrade

If you want to upgrade your distribution to the latest one, use the below command.

sudo apt dist-upgrade

What should my sources.list look like ?

Your /etc/apt/sources.list.d/blackbuntu.list file should contain the following content.

deb https://deb.blackbuntu.org/ apt/stable/

What is a repository ?

Repositories are particular locations on the web which contain the thousands of packages (each containing programs, applications, etc) that you would need on your computer. The sources.list file contains the list of all the repositories that will be used to download packages in Synaptic and APT.

How do I prepare a bootable BlackBuntu USB drive ?

First of all you must start by downloading the latest version of BlackBuntu from our download page.

Creating a bootable BlackBuntu USB key in a Linux environment is easy. Once you’ve downloaded and verified your BlackBuntu ISO file, you can use the dd command to copy it over to your USB stick using the following procedure. Note that you’ll need to be running as root, or to execute the dd command with sudo. The following example assumes a Linux Ubuntu desktop — depending on the distro you’re using, a few specifics may vary slightly, but the general idea should be very similar.

First, you’ll need to identify the device path to use to write the image to your USB drive. Without the USB drive inserted into a port, execute the command.

sudo fdisk -l

Output

The terminal should return something like the following.

Disk /dev/sda: 447,1 GiB, 480103981056 bytes, 937703088 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 4EC0A4CF-B36D-481C-90A0-334FD0768CB3

Device Start End Sectors Size Type
/dev/sda1 2048 1050623 1048576 512M EFI System
/dev/sda2 1050624 2549759 1499136 732M Linux filesystem
/dev/sda3 2549760 937701375 935151616 445,9G Linux filesystem

Now, plug your USB drive into an available USB port on your system, and run the same command, sudo fdisk -l a second time. The output will look something (again, not exactly) like this, showing an additional device which wasn’t there previously, in this example “/dev/sdb”, a 16GB USB drive.

Disk /dev/sda: 447,1 GiB, 480103981056 bytes, 937703088 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 4EC0A4CF-B36D-481C-90A0-334FD0768CB3

Device Start End Sectors Size Type
/dev/sda1 2048 1050623 1048576 512M EFI System
/dev/sda2 1050624 2549759 1499136 732M Linux filesystem
/dev/sda3 2549760 937701375 935151616 445,9G Linux filesystem

Disk /dev/sdb: 15,6 GiB, 15610576896 bytes
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: JH54XSMP-N45M-715A-77M5-548PML4MA5SD

Device Start End Sectors Id System
/dev/sdb1 64 5836831 2918384 17 Hidden HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sdb2 5836832 5963615 63392 1 Linux FAT12

We are now going to copy the ISO to the USB. The example command below assumes that the ISO image you’re writing is named blackbuntu-1.0.0-20190105-1-amd64.iso and is in your current working directory. The blocksize parameter can be increased, and while it may speed up the operation of the dd command, it can occasionally produce unbootable USB drives, depending on your system and a lot of different factors. The recommended value, “bs=512k”, is conservative and reliable.

dd if=blackbuntu-1.0.0-20190105-1-amd64.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=512k

Imaging the USB drive can take a good amount of time, over ten minutes or more is not unusual, as the sample output below shows.

The dd command provides no feedback until it’s completed, but if your drive has an access indicator, you’ll probably see it flickering from time to time. The time to dd the image across will depend on the speed of the system used, USB drive itself, and USB port it’s inserted into. Once dd has finished imaging the drive, it will output something that looks like this.

5823+1 records in
5823+1 records out
3053371392 bytes (3.5 GB) copied, 746.211 s, 4.1 MB/s

You can now boot into a BlackBuntu Live / Installer environment using the USB device.

Should I encrypt my harddrive ?

Yes we highly recommended to encrypt your hard-drive during the first setup in order to avoid any tools conflict.

Where can bugs be submitted ?

If the bug involves a specific piece of software maintained by BlackBuntu, then search the project on Github and open an issue.

If the bug involves a software package that is not listed, then you should contact the maintainer of that particular software. If you are not sure what software is involved, or if you don’t know how to contact the upstream developer, then contact us.

Why should I use BlackBuntu ?

BlackBuntu was created for the Ubuntu Lovers with the aim to promote the culture of pentest and security IT environment. Penetration testing is a time intensive job, maintaining your toolkit shouldn’t be also. We make it easier for professionals to accomplish the important stuff by reducing the time and effort wasted making sure their tools work.

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